Our Museum features six distinct vintage themes - The Museum itself, a traditional Irish farmhouse kitchen and hearth, a traditional Irish pub and a shop. When you come to visit, you will be invited to explore each area. You will even be treated to a complimentary cup of tea (maybe even a few biscuits!) at our kitchen table. Please take a few minutes to sample each of these themes below.

The Museum

butter churn

The Museum contains a vast array of exhibits, agricultural and domestic. It has an outdoor and an indoor component. Some of the larger farm machinery items such as tractors and hay rakes are usually exhibited outdoors, particularly during the summer months. Domestic exhibits, everything from tea canisters to butter churns and washing machines are exhibited in the indoor section. Enjoy!!

The Kitchen & Hearth

kitchen

Our traditional Irish farmhouse kitchen is a most attractive adjunct to our Museum and is a 'must see' for any visitor. It features an original fireplace which has been painstakingly renovated to it's original glory. It features sugan chairs and a blower, which were trademarks of Irish famhouses from the early nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. An antique iron cot adorns the corner, similar to that in which your parents or grandparents would have spent their earliest days. The centrepiece of our kitchen is a fine oak table where you will be invited to partake in a complimentary cup of tea - a traditional rural Irish gesture of hospitality to a passing visitor.

The Shop

The Shop

For very many years, a very necessary and focal part of Irish rural life. Every small community would have had a local shop within walking distance, carrying provisions as diverse as farm tools and implements to ingredients for home baking such as flour and raisins. Our shop has been cleverly and colourfully restored to an appearance common in early twentieth century rural Ireland. It also features many traditional stock items, which ruefully re-create the appearance of yesteryear. The antique glass cabinet counter enables impressive viewing of many of these curiosities.

The Pub

The Pub

Along with the shop, a very necessary focal point of Irish rural life, where local news and gossip was exchanged, land and livestock were bought and sold and marriages were arranged - usually without the presence, or even the knowledge, of the young lady concerned! The pub was far more than just a watering hole! Very often, as here, the pub and shop were opposite ends of the counter in one room. Our pub features an interesting array of antique bottles, draught taps, glasses and porcelain containers, evocative of where our forbearers wet their lips and conducted important business

The Forge

The Forge

The forge or Smithy was yet another essential establishment in every rural Irish community of yesteryear. All rural parishes would have had at least one forge, some as many as three or four! The local blacksmith catered for the needs of all comers, making shoes for the single jennet of the lowly cottier or for the numerous hulking draught-horses of the squire. As with the shop and pub, a focal point of the community where gossip was exchanged and business was transacted.

The Chemist

The Chemist

At least one Chemist or Apothecary was to be found in every small town and most large villages, dispensing remedies for humans and animals alike, often the same remedy being applied to multiple species! Long before the days of the now stringent approvals process of the Irish Medicines Board, your trusty local chemist had a concoction for every condition! Whether it was your wife's annoying haemhorroids or a constipated bullock, into the back room would go your local chemist with his mortar and pestle and emerge ten minutes later with the 'solution'. Efficacy? Well, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger!